Tax Tips you can bank on

Quick question howard,

Have you gotten caught up in believing the
popular rhetoric about the “rich” not paying
their fair share of taxes?

Let’s look at the IRS’s own stats for 2017
tax returns (that latest year for which
data is complete).

Below are rounded-off numbers, with specific
percentages following in parentheses)

The TOP 1% of tax filers, those whose
adjusted gross income (AGI) was more
than a half million dollars), paid nearly
40% (38.47%) of ALL taxes collected.

The TOP 5% paid 60% (59.14%) of all taxes.
The TOP 10% paid 70% (70.08%) of all taxes.

Meanwhile the entire “bottom 50%”
COMBINED, paid only 3% (3.11%) of
ALL taxes collected across America.

And, due to tax Credits, many of them
are getting a refund that is greater than
the total taxes they paid-in. That, in my
opinion, is both fair and deserved.

Those between the Top 10% and the
Bottom 50% paid the remaining 27%.
Looks like a more-than-level playing
field to me.

Question:
Since YOU are running YOUR OWN
business, aren’t you HOPING that
someday YOU will become earn the
title “upper income earner?”

Just some food for thought,
Dr. Ron Mueller, MBA, Ph.D.
Small-Business Tax-Savings Coach

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

 

Tax Tips You Can Bank On

howard, as you well know, a small-
business owner often wears many different
hats. You mAY have to wear your Boss Hat
one day, and your Employee Hat the next.
Then, when tax season comes around, you
may put on your Tax Hat.

Some small-business owners (SBO) think
of doing their taxes as just another item to
quickly cross off their to-do list, but taking
that approach could leave you open to
mistakes when filing and paying taxes.

Accidentally failing to comply with tax laws,
violating tax codes, or filling out tax forms
incorrectly, can leave you and your
business open to possible penalties.

The IRS encourages small businesses to
explore using a reputable tax preparer –
including certified public accountants,
Enrolled Agents or other knowledgeable
tax professionals – to help with their tax
situation. Filing electronically can also
help avoid common errors.

Being aware of common mistakes can
also help tame stress of tax time. Here
are a few of the most common tax-filing
errors according to the IRS…

#1. Underpaying Estimated Taxes

Business owners should generally make
estimated tax payments if you expect to
owe tax of $1,000 or more when your
return is filed. If you don’t pay enough tax
through withholding and estimated tax
payments, you may owe a penalty.

#2. Depositing Employment Taxes

Business owners with employees are
expected to deposit taxes you withhold,
plus the employer’s share of those taxes,
through electronic fund transfers. If those
taxes are not deposited correctly and on
time, the owner may be charged a penalty.

#3. Filing Late

Just like Individual returns, Business tax
returns must be filed in a timely manner.
To avoid late filing penalties, you should
be aware of all tax requirements for your
type of business and the filing deadlines.

#4. Not Separating Business
      and Personal Expenses

It can be tempting to use one credit card
for all expenses especially if the business
is a sole proprietorship. Doing so can make
it very hard to tell legitimate business
expenses from personal ones. This could
cause errors when claiming deductions and
become a problem if either you, p ersonally
or your business is ever audited.

As we begin to approach tax season again,
those are a few tax tips the IRS wants you
to be aware of.

Helping THOUSANDS to SAVE a BUNDLE,
          Dr. Ron Mueller, MBA, Ph.D.
Author, Speaker, Small-Biz Tax-Savings Coach

P.S.
Now is the perfect time to watch the
recorded web briefing posted at
www.DeductHealthCosts.com .If you take
the one action recommended, you could
be among the tiny percentage of small-
business owners to be able to legally
write-off ALL health-r elated expenses
incurred during ALL of 2020 for ALL of
the members of your family.

This is NOT ONLY for monthly premiums,
but ALSO for your massive Annual Deductible,
all co-pays and co-insurance, health expenses
that are not covered under your plan – even
many health and nutritional costs. This could
be your BIGGEST of all tax deductions in
2020, but ONLY IF you set-it-up NO LAT ER
THAN Dec. 31, 2019. Most sole-proprietors
and LLCs can qualify. Get the details at
www.DeductHealthCosts.com .

Save $3,500 by Dropping These 4 Everyday Luxuries

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Save $3,500 by Dropping These 4 Everyday Luxuries

4 MINUTE READ

You’re not splurging on luxury cars or flashy diamonds. But if you’re like most Americans, you may be losing a small fortune each year (nearly $3,500!) on relatively minor indulgences.

Instead of letting your money run wild, decide how to start saving money by revising your budget in these four everyday areas:

1. Daily Lunches Out

You had great intentions this year. You were finally going to start bringing your own lunch to work. But then someone invited you to that awesome hot chicken place down the street. And after that, you got a serious craving for some Tex-Mex. Fast-forward a few weeks, and you’re picking up lunch more than packing it. So what’s the big deal?

On average, Americans spend $20 per week eating out at lunchtime.(1) That’s $1,040 per year! Even if you just swing by a drive-thru, at $7-8 a pop, that’s a lot of lunch money. To curb your spending, budget a few special noontime meals per month. And when you do finally get that break from leftover casseroles and reheated quiches, you’ll appreciate this little luxury even more.

2. Premium Cable Packages

Be honest: How many of the hundreds of cable channels do you regularly watch? Ten? Maybe fifteen? Why shell out for a ton of unused channels when, for a fraction of the cost, you can fulfill all your binge-watching needs with online streaming? Even with today’s cheaper alternatives, millions of us are still paying around $66 per month for expanded basic cable.(2)

 

Ready to start saving? Download our free budgeting tool today!

That’s a lot of money to blow on your favorite sports and movie channels. If the big game is really that important to you, just downgrade to basic cable and a sports-only package. Or go to a friend’s house with a big bag of chips and a Crock-Pot full of melty cheese-and-chili dip. Because no self-respecting basketball fan can turn down queso.

3. Unused Gym Memberships

After a stressful day of 4-year-old tantrums or never-ending meetings, hitting the gym can give your body and mind a much-needed break. But that means you have to change clothes, get in your car, drive to the gym, and then try to outrun some stick-thin teenager on the treadmill next to you. Or you could just eat a pint of ice cream. Decisions, decisions.

Statistic Brain estimates we waste about $39 each month underutilizing our health clubs.(3) So if cooking dinner, giving the kids a bath, and reading five bedtime stories is your reality, it could make more sense to run around the block rather than hit the gym. Do whatever works best for you. Just don’t blow $468 a year on best-laid plans.

4. Regular Coffee Trips

Coffee is a necessity for many of us. It’s like air—deliciously caffeinated air. But that’s no reason to blow an average of $3.28 per day on a cup of coffee.(4) That amounts to about $23 per week. We know the talented barista down at Jittery Java handcrafts your beverage with love each morning, but let’s get real. If you buy some decent beans and add your own syrups and creams, your home brew will taste just as sweet. Plus, with savings of nearly $1,200 per year, you can now afford some darn good beans.

Hear us, America. Everything is good in moderation—even coffee and TV. But moderation often trips us up. That’s where the budget comes in. It’s okay to plan for occasional splurges, but make sure you’re not allowing small luxuries to run away with your future goals. Control your spending now, so you can live and give like a rock star later on.

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

10 Ways to Stop Overspending on Impulse Buys

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10 Ways to Stop Overspending on Impulse Buys

6 MINUTE READ

Let’s be honest here: making an impulse buy is kind of fun—at least in the moment. You walk into a store not anticipating an extra purchase, yet the perfect sale appears right in front of you! It’s meant to be, right?

A recent survey by Slickdeals found that Americans impulsively spend an average of $450 every month.(1) That adds up to and extra $5,400 spent every year!

So for some of you, grabbing that coveted item means you’ll be overspending—or worse—using a credit card to pay for it. Whether you’re on Baby Step 1 or Baby Step 7, we’ve come up with 10 tips to help you dodge the temptation to overspend.

1. Make a budget and stick to it.

Okay, first things first: You need a budget. If you don’t already have one, create yours in less than 10 minutes with our free budgeting app EveryDollar. But you have to actually stick to it! A budget isn’t a magic wand that will suddenly make all of your money behave. It’s on you to tell your money where to go each month and then follow that plan.

2. Give yourself permission to spend.

Yes, we just told you to stick to your budget—and you always should. But it’s also important to throw a little fun money in there too! Give yourself (and your spouse if you’re married) a line item in the budget with your name on it. This is money you can spend how you want on and what you want. Depending on your budget, this might be $10 a month or $100 a month. Just make sure the amount is reasonable and affordable for your budget!

 

Ready to start saving? Download our free budgeting tool today!

So the next time you’re walking through the mall and something catches your eye, simply check your “fun money” fund.

3. Wait overnight before you make a purchase.

Ramsey Personality Rachel Cruze said it best: “When you sleep on the decision, you put some time between your emotions and the transaction.” Give yourself a day to calm down when an impulse buy gets you jazzed. Once you’re cool and have a fresh perspective, ask yourself if you’ll actually use the item or service and if you can pay cash for it. That’s a great way to put the purchase into perspective.

And watch out for deals that are only good for 24 hours—don’t let a countdown rush you into buying anything! Remember the offer, save some money, and be ready for it next time if you can’t afford it right now. Because a sale will come back around. Trust us.

4. Shop with a plan.

Determine what you want to buy and how much you’ll spend before you ever start shopping. With a plan in place, you’ll be less likely to give into overspending. Your shopping list can range from grocery items to the Christmas gifts you plan to purchase for your extended family—just know before you go.

5. Beware of joining too many email lists.

Signing up for a store’s email list can be a great way to snag 15–20% off coupons or even (gasp) free shipping! If you have a purchase you know you’ll be making soon, go ahead and sign up for the company’s email list to score that extra discount.

But keep in mind that an email blast can also be your worst enemy.

Picture it: You’re doing great sticking to your budget. Everything is accounted for and every purchase is planned. Things are going great! That is, until you check your inbox and find 15 different emails announcing one sale after another. Danger, danger!

You weren’t even thinking about shopping! But now they’ve caught your attention and you just have to see what’s on sale. Step away from the wave of emails and unsubscribe as fast as you can!

6. Don’t shop when you’re emotional.

You may be having a great day and make an impulse buy in the height of the moment. But it could also be the opposite—you’re having a rough time, you see something you want, and you tell yourself you deserve it.

Either of these scenarios can easily happen. Don’t let your emotions dictate your spending.

7. Bring someone with you when you shop.

Do you have a sibling or friend who is willing to get in your face and tell you not to buy something? Bring them on your shopping trip! Tell them what you plan to buy and ask them to talk some sense into you if you start straying from the strategy. Sweeten the deal by offering to buy them a coffee afterward.

8. Take only the amount of cash you’ll need.

Figure out how much money you need for the items you want and only take that amount. You could even go a step further and leave your debit card at home so you don’t tempt yourself to buy more with plastic. According to a study on spending behavior, people who shop with a card tend to spend more than they would with cash.(2)

If you stick to your shopping plan and don’t bring any extra money along on the trip, you can’t make an impulse buy. Now that’s the power of cash!

9. Stop the comparisons.

If you always compare what you have (or don’t have) to others, you’ll never be satisfied. It’s just like Rachel Cruze said in her book Love Your Life, Not Theirs, “When we start comparing ourselves to other people, we’re playing a game we’ll never win.”

Instead of looking at what someone else has and thinking, Oh! I need that too!, take a step back and be thankful. Learn to be grateful for what you do have. If you change your perspective, you might find you already have more than you thought.

10. Keep your goals in mind.

Giving into an impulse buy won’t help you achieve your goals—whether that’s getting out of debt, paying off your mortgage or investing for your future. Overspending will eat up any extra money you were saving to put toward those goals.

Remember This Before You Impulse Buy

Dave always says, “Children do what feels good, adults devise a plan and follow it.” The excitement of impulse spending never lasts. Control the urge to fork over money when you discover a jacket on sale or a sweet offer from an online deal. That discipline will get you something priceless—peace of mind. And that’s one purchase you’ll never regret!

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

30 Ways to Save Up to $1,000 With Minimal Effort

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30 Ways to Save Up to $1,000 With Minimal Effort

30 Ways to Save Up to $1,000 With Minimal Effort

12 MINUTE READ

Saving money isn’t always easy. If it were, everyone would do it. And with 39% of Americans having no savings to speak of at all, it’s clear to see that a lot of us could use some help with it.(1)

But what if it was easy? What if there were tons of small ways you could make a huge impact on your retirement, vacation, debt or mortgage each year?
We want you to see just how effortless saving $100–1,000 can be. Add a few changes to your daily, weekly or monthly routine and watch your savings go up!

Daily Money-Saving Tips

1. Use cash-back apps.

Will it make you rich? Nope. But using cash-back apps can add up to some serious savings. Ibotta, Shopkick, Receipt Hog, Checkout 51 and Dosh are a few of the many apps that will give you points (which add up to moolah) just for scanning your receipt or buying specific products. But be sure you’re not getting caught up in the temptation to spend money at stores just to get the cash-back points.

2. Turn off the TV.

Is The Little Mermaid still playing after the kids have left the room? It’s amazing how many times the TV is on when no one is even around to watch the tube. Shut that sucker off! And make sure everyone knows to turn it off if they’re not going to watch it anymore.

 

Ready to start saving? Download our free budgeting tool today!

3. Turn off the lights.

By the same token, it’s like your mama always told you: Turn the lights off when you leave the room! It might seem minor, but those small expenses really add up. So when you walk out of the room, just turn off the lights. Really—it’s that simple.

4. Install energy-efficient lights wherever you can.

Whether it’s LED (light-emitting diode) or CFL (compact fluorescent) bulbs, just making the switch to more energy-efficient lighting can really impact your power bill at the end of the month. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, using these types of lights in your five most used light fixtures can save you around $75 a year.(2)

5. Brew your own coffee.

Your daily drive-thru coffee is probably costing you somewhere in the neighborhood of $65–120 each month. Grab some high-quality beans and a nice travel mug. Then, turn on the coffee maker and stick it to Starbucks!

6. Change your office hours.

Traffic jams cost Americans a pretty penny each year in gas and car wear and tear. Not to mention, spending hours in a car majorly zaps your productivity level. Plus, traffic jams are just downright annoying.

Save hundreds a year by changing your daily work schedule. If possible, drive to work either earlier or later to stay off the road at peak times. That way, you’re not burning precious fuel or wasting precious time sitting in traffic. Bonus: Your overall mood will probably get a boost too!

7. Use a programable thermostat.

We’ve all heard this one, but how many of us are actually doing it? There’s no need to run the air conditioning or heat if you’re out all day. A programable thermostat can regulate the temperature of your home year-round and help keep your bill under control.

Or if you don’t want to take the plunge, just turn down the heat or the air conditioning while you’re away from the house. When you’re sleeping, open up the windows or use a fan instead of blasting the air conditioning. And when you’re chilly, just throw on some extra blankets or use a space heater. You’d be surprised at how much you can save by taking these shortcuts.

8. Pack your lunch.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that Americans spent an average of $3,365 on food away from home . . . also known as eating out.(3) Think about it: If you spend $10 on lunch every day, that’s $50 a week—which adds up to $200 a month! Ouch! 

Believe it or not, packing a lunch takes way less effort than calling in your order, driving there, waiting, paying, picking it up, and driving back. And you could save $10 a day just by packing leftovers or turkey sandwiches! Now that’s our idea of super-saving.

9. Ban bottled water.

News flash: Water is basically free. You don’t have to buy expensive bottled water just because you see other people with it in their shopping carts. Try drinking from the tap for a while and see if you survive. If your tap water is downright disgusting, then invest in a water filter to help you out.

10. Embrace the 24-hour rule.

Oh, delayed gratification, how we love (and sometimes hate) you. It’s amazing how much clearer our thinking can be if we take 24 hours and step back from what we’re wanting to buy. Make a habit of giving yourself 24 hours before you make an impulsive, “gotta have it” purchase.

Weekly Money-Saving Tips

1. Split your paycheck and deposit a percentage into your savings.

It’s easy to make saving a priority when you never have an option not to. What in the world do we mean by that? Set up your paycheck to automatically deposit a percentage into your savings account every payday. That way, you don’t have to remember to do it and you can’t talk yourself out of it (you know you would).

2. Save on insurance with an Endorsed Local Provider (ELP).

Are you paying too much for insurance . . . are you sure? A lot of people don’t actually realize how much money they can save by taking a deeper look at their insurance expenses. Trying to make sense of it all can be overwhelming, so give an ELP a call to see if they can help sort it out for you.

3. Use less laundry detergent and cut dryer sheets in half.

It might sound super cheap, but things like this really do add up. Cut back on the detergent and tear those dryer sheets in half. You probably won’t even notice any difference in the clean quality of your clothes, but your budget will thank you for buying less!

4. Temporarily freeze your spending.

We spend a lot of extra money “here and there” on nonessentials. Instead of spending $100 on impulse buys, try a spending freeze. How? Simple. Don’t buy any nonessential items for a whole week, month or until you hit a specific savings goal—you decide how long.

It sounds restrictive, but knowing the spending freeze has a time stamp on it actually makes it a fun little challenge. Just raid your pantry or fridge for meal ideas, avoid Target and Costco like the plague, and wait on any hot new items you just “have” to buy.

Not spending money is the best way to save it.

5. Start couponing.

Using coupons is a breeze, but a lot of people end up leaving that savings on the table just because they don’t go the extra mile. Take the time to look up a discount code, cut out a coupon, or download it on your phone. Believe us, this tiny smidge of effort is worth it!

6. Only eat out once a week.

For some people, eating out once a week is a major splurge. But for others, eating out only once a week is a major sacrifice. No matter where you fall, try to limit your restaurant eating to once a week and see what a big difference it can make in your budget!

7. Order water at restaurants.

Did we mention water is free? That includes when you’re at a restaurant. Skip the soda, the sweet tea or your adult beverage of choice and opt for the free H2O.

Monthly Money-Saving Tips

1. Cut the cable cord.

Let’s be real. Cable television is expensive. And with so many alternatives to having a cable package, there’s really no reason to keep clinging to your precious cable cord—especially when it could free up an extra $200 a month!

2. Switch grocery stores.

Instead of shopping at big-name grocers, try a discount chain like Aldi. As long as you don’t mind bagging your own groceries and renting a cart for a (refundable) quarter, you can save a lot of money. Even if you only save $25 a week, you’ll still have $100 extra in your wallet at the month’s end! So take a good look at your grocery shopping habits and see where you can save.

P.S. Don’t forget to actually stick to your grocery list.

3. Buy generic.

If you’d rather stick to your favorite stores, at least go generic—especially when it comes to milk and juice, pantry staples (spices, flour, sugar) and even certain medicines.

Think your food won’t taste as good? Think again. A group of Consumer Reports “taste testers” found most store brands measure up to the name brands in overall taste and quality—and they’re usually 15–30% lower in price!(4) Worth it.

4. Cancel your subscriptions and memberships.

Are you paying for multiple monthly or yearly subscriptions? Think about it: $12.99 for Netflix, $20 for Stitch Fix or $119 for Amazon Prime. Which of these have you not used in a few months? Cancel them. If you miss one, order it again. If not, you made the right choice and probably saved yourself a hundred bucks in the process! And here’s the thing: You can pick your subscription back up whenever you want to, so it’s not like anything is set in stone.

5. Replace two restaurant outings a month with your slow cooker.

Heading out to eat with your entire gang can cost close to three digits in a hurry. That’s ridiculous! Replace two restaurant outings a month with your slow cooker. It’s convenient, requires little effort, and makes tons of food for way less.

6. Borrow appliances.

We’ve all heard about lending a cup of sugar to your neighbor, but how about lending them your food processor? Now that’s really something! Need a handheld immersion blender to make some butternut squash soup? Borrow that rarely used appliance from a friend or neighbor instead of running to the store to buy it. Just be sure to send some yummy leftovers back as a thank you.

7. Weatherproof your home.

If you feel like you’re always heating or cooling your house only to have all that precious temperature-controlled air leak out, you might just be right. Seal up your doors and windows to reduce strain on your air conditioner and heating system—it might help you save up to 20% on your energy costs!(5)

8. Use low-flow fixtures.

If your water bill is always sky-high, look into low-flow faucets, toilets and showerheads. The U.S. Department of Energy reports that installing low-flow fixtures can give you a water use savings of 25–60%.(6)

9. Pay with cash.

An amazing thing happens when you pay with actual cash and not just your debit card: You feel it in your gut in a different way. It might even slightly pain you to watch that cash slip out of your hands. And when you’re rocking a couple twenties in your wallet, you’re probably going to hoard them for as long as possible instead of mindlessly spending them.

If you’re constantly overspending on certain categories in your budget, then give the envelope system a try. Just carry your budgeted amount in cash (let’s say $150 for groceries) and when the cash in the envelope is gone, that’s it! You can’t spend anymore!

10. Save loose change.

Now that you’re using cold, hard cash, you’re going to have some leftover coins. Remember that stuff? Dump all your loose change into a jar and see how much you’ve saved up at the end of the month!

11. Wear your specs.

Contact lenses can cost anywhere from $220–700 a year, according to consumer site All About Vision.(7) If you’re trying to meet a financial goal, wear your not-so-pretty-but-perfectly-fine glasses for a few months instead. Hey, at least you’ll look smarter (and maybe even a little hip too).

12. Lower your cell phone bill.

You may be shocked every time you get a glance at your cell phone bill, and for good reason. J.D. Power reports the average monthly bill will set you back $157, so it probably clocks in right under your cable bill.(8) Sheesh!

Call up your cellular provider and cancel the phone insurance, switch to a different plan, or jump to a different carrier. You’d be surprised by how quickly you could free up 30–50 bucks with just a few changes to your cell phone bill.

13. Make a budget.

This one’s super easy. If you really want to save money each month and curb your spending, then you need to do a monthly budget—before the month even begins. Our ultra-simple and free budgeting app EveryDollar makes it easy to see where your money is going and helps you stay motivated as you’re working toward your budgeting goals!

Already have a budget? Great! Now trim it up. Shave five bucks from every budget category before the month begins. That means your restaurant cash will be $45 instead of $50, and your clothing fund will be $25 instead of $30. It’s barely noticeable, but collectively, it adds up!

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

How to Stop Spending Money

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How to Stop Spending Money

How to Stop Spending Money

10 MINUTE READ

No matter where or how we shop, the temptation to overspend on random stuff follows us everywhere we go. Yup, we’re talking about the aisles right next to the store’s checkout lane. Mini hand sanitizers, gum and that magazine with the latest news on the royal family?! It seems they’ve thought of everything—or that’s what they want you to think.

With so many ways to shop (online, on our phones and in-store), how can we avoid making mistakes that bust the budget? Don’t worry, we’ve got the scoop on how to stop spending money so you can start actually winning with money.

Reasons Why You’re Overspending

People spend money for so many reasons, and if we’re just a little honest with ourselves, most of those reasons can be chalked up to emotions. Many times, we can blame our overspending on five things:

1. Social Media

Need we say more? Picture it: It’s Saturday morning, and before you realize it, you’re scrolling through your social media feed to catch up on what your friends are up to. And before your feet even hit the floor, you’ve spent $30 on that new, life-changing thing you thought you needed.

If you’re honest, you didn’t have to work too hard to picture it (because you lived it last weekend). Let’s face it: We all want what we don’t have. And we want it because we think it will make life that much better.

 

Ready to start saving? Download our free budgeting tool today!

But social media makes the comparison game even stronger these days. With Pinterest, your friend’s post about their brand-new couch with those perfect pillows and that popular blogger’s sponsored posts about that incredible, all-inclusive resort . . . where does it end?

Newsflash: It won’t. All of these things just drain your budget, steal from those future financial goals you have . . . and steal your joy.

2. Not Tracking Your Spending

It doesn’t matter how large (or small) your income is—if you’re not tracking your spending, you’ll never be in control of your money. In fact, you’ll always feel like your money owns you.

Listen: Living paycheck to paycheck is the pits. If you’re wondering where all your hard-earned money went each month, it’s time to start tracking it! Stick with us, and we’ll show you how.

3. Shopping to Feel Better

Some people like to joke about being a shopaholic, but compulsive spending, otherwise known as retail therapy, is a thing. For most of us, spending on impulse just because we want it now is the problem. We see something and buy it before we think about what’s in the checking account (or about our financial goals, for that matter).

4. Paying With Plastic

If you haven’t noticed, you spend more when paying with plastic. Whether that’s a credit card (everyone loves shopping with someone else’s money) or a debit card, the research is the same.1 When you spend with cash, you feel it. You feel those crisp (or wadded up) green bills leave your hand, and it hurts. Something inside of you cringes. Just moments before, you had money, and now, you don’t.

Think about it, when you’re shopping with plastic, it’s easy to spend more, because you don’t physically see the money right in front of you. So, the next time you make a purchase, pay in cash, and you’ll see exactly what we mean. Plus, there’s no overspending—you can only spend what you have with you.

Here’s the good news: You can overcome these overspending habits with a little planning, self-discipline and long-term thinking. Here’s how we suggest you stop spending money.

8 Ways to Stop Spending Money

1. Know What You’re Spending Money On

Making and sticking to a budget every single month is what is going to help you get out of debt and stay out of debt.

If this is your first time budgeting, you might be surprised by how much money you’re spending each week or even each month on little things, like coffee, lunches or that snack shop at work that your spouse doesn’t know about.

When you make your first budget, you need to make sure your basic needs (or your Four Walls) are covered. These are:

  • Food
  • Utilities
  • Shelter
  • Transportation

While these are the necessities, they can also offer an opportunity to cut back on the extras. You really don’t need to go out to dinner every night or buy new clothes every week. And if you are, it’s time to invite Marie Kondo into your life.

2. Make Your Budget Work for You

Now, you’re ready to create a monthly spending plan for everything from gas to going out to eat. This is also called a zero-based budget. This means your income minus your expenses needs to equal zero and you’ve told every single hard-earned dollar where to go. Just remember, it’s a working budget. You have to keep coming back to it in order to stay on track.

If this is your first budget, you’ll want to give yourself grace. It takes a few months to make your budget work for you. But if you’re an expert, take another look through your monthly expenses for other ways to trim your spending.

Do you really need to spend money on clothes every single week? Probably not. What about that gym membership you haven’t used in eight months? It’s time to get really honest with yourself and start trimming the fat out of your budget. Answering these questions can help put you on the path to spending your money with intentionality.

Use a free budgeting app, like EveryDollar, to create your first budget in 10 minutes. You’ll be able to plan your budget, track your spending, and monitor your debt and savings progress each month.

3. Shop With a Goal in Mind

We’ve all been there. You’re out of shampoo and toothpaste. So, with those two items in mind, you make a quick run to Target. But as soon as you walk through the door, you feel the gravitational pull toward the dollar spot and fill your basket with a bunch of those colorful cell phone chargers and water toys for the kids that you swear will get used all the time.

After a few impulse buys, a quick trip to the store for a few essentials just got . . . expensive, thanks to a few seemingly harmless purchases.

But does anyone really plan on getting sidetracked while they’re out shopping for essentials? Probably not. But if you often get caught in this scenario, you might want to make a point to avoid the stores that trigger overspending.

4. Stop Spending Money at Restaurants

Changing how you spend money on food is one of the easiest ways to save money. And we all know that going out to eat gets expensive fast. If you’re spending $15 on lunch four times a week, that’s $60 a week—and $240 a month! Imagine how quickly you could pay off debt with that kind of money!

Consider this: Instead of heading into the grocery store and wandering up and down the aisles, create your meal plan for the week, make a list before you go, and then stick to it. If you need to leave the kids (or your spouse) at home to save even more, don’t think twice about it. Planning your meals in advance means lowering your overall food costs.

Speaking of lunch, bring your lunch to work every day. We promise—it doesn’t have to be complicated! Set aside some time on Sunday afternoons to meal prep, or take 15 minutes each night to make a sandwich or pack up some leftovers for the next day.

We’re not saying you shouldn’t ever treat yourself to a nice dinner on a special occasion or Sunday morning brunch—just make sure it’s in the budget.

5. Resist Sales

Who doesn’t love a good deal? Retailers know their customers, and they also know the irresistible pull of a flashy (and perfectly placed) sales rack. But how much is all this saving really costing you?

If you buy a sweater you never intended to buy just because it’s 25% off, you’re paying 75% more than you would have. Sorry, shoppers, that’s still called spending, not saving.

Avoid these shopping traps by making a list before you go! Then, practice some self-discipline once you’re there. If you see an item on sale that isn’t on your list, it wasn’t meant to be.

6. Swear Off Debt

If you’re serious about getting your overspending under control, you have to swear off debt—for good. After all, debt steals from your income. Not only that, you’re stuck paying on the loan or credit card (plus interest) until it’s gone for good. It’s true: Your debt owns you until you pay it off once and for all.

We live in a world where just about anything can be financed or borrowed, which can give you a sense of financial security. But that financial security isn’t real. It makes you think if you can afford the payment, you can afford the new car, house, or big purchase. But in reality, if you don’t have the cash to pay for something right now, you can’t really afford it.

So, go ahead. Make the decision to cancel your credit cards, and commit to living debt-free from this moment forward. And just as a refresher: Credit is an enabler. It enables you to overspend. But without it, overspending isn’t an option.

7. Delay Gratification

If you’re having trouble sticking to your new budget and shopping list, imagine how you’ll be using that must-have item a month from now.

Will that sweater still look good after a few washes? Will your kids still be playing with that overpriced toy set? Will those cheap shoes last through the season?

The majority of the time, the answer is: Put it back. But what if you still want it? Then, you wait. Work it into next month’s budget and revisit your feelings in 30 days. If you still love it, you’ll be able to buy it without the guilt, because it’s already in the budget.

8. Challenge Yourself to Reach Your New Goals

Put your willpower to the test by buying just the bare necessities for one month. You’ll be amazed by how little you actually need.

You’ll also be able to identify the things you don’t necessarily need, but simply like to have. Do you like using your gym membership because it helps you stay active? Keep it. Does your weekly visit to the chiropractor keep your back in tip-top shape? Keep going. If it fits into your budget (and doesn’t cause you to go into debt), you can spend money on it.

The key to stop your overspending is creating better money habits and being intentional with what you spend your money on. Don’t step into a store again without a budget and a plan! That plan can be right at your fingertips with EveryDollar. This free app makes it easy to create (and stick to) your budget.

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

SAVING 5 Small Budget Cuts That Equal Big Savings

SAVING

5 Small Budget Cuts That Equal Big Savings

4 MINUTE READ

Don’t think little budget cuts matter? Just ask UPS. The company figured out that making left-hand turns cost them time and money, so they asked drivers to make right turns whenever possible. That took a whopping 20.4 million miles off of their routes in 2010 with that little adjustment. Small change, big difference.

Making minor changes in your spending habits can help you save money faster than you think. Check out these examples of the dollars you could save by small budget cuts and tweaks in your spending habits.

1. Dining out options

Restaurants fall under categories: fast (think McDonald’s), fast-casual (think Chipotle), casual sit-down (think Chili’s) and fine dining (think dress code!). The higher up the food chain, the more you’ll pay. A dinner for four at Chipotle will cost you about $45. Take your family to Chili’s and you’ll spend more than $50, not including tip. If you grabbed two pizzas from Little Caesar’s instead, you’re only out $10 plus tax. That extra money could really get your debt snowball rolling.

Related: Get Out of Debt With the Debt Snowball Plan

2. Movie night-mares

Nothing says night out like watching that latest blockbuster with a friend. It can also be a wallet buster. The cost of two tickets ($8.50 to $9 each), a bucket of popcorn ($8) and drinks (another $6 each) can make you feel like you’re in a horror flick. If you’re set on seeing the movie on the big screen—some are just better that way—then opt for the matinee and eat beforehand. Or, better yet, sacrifice the big screen and save even more by staying home with Netflix. Spend a few dollars at the grocery store for snacks, and you’re set for a great movie for less than half the cost!

 

Ready to start saving? Download our free budgeting tool today!

Related: What’s Your Box Office Budget?

3. Coffee craziness

Let’s be honest. A coffee drinker’s day doesn’t begin until that first sip of a ginormous Frappuccino with a shot of something. That morning ritual can easily run $5 a pop. Skipping the coffee shop and brewing your own cup of joe even twice a week can save you 40 bucks a month. That can put a smile on your face—no caffeine necessary.

4. Road trip traps

Everybody loves a road trip . . . especially cashiers at gas stations. Loading up on munchies at every bathroom break can add up to big bucks, and that doesn’t include the cost of lunch. If you purchase sodas, salty snacks and some sweets, you can easily top $10 per pit stop. Save money by stocking up at the grocery store before you hit the road and make memories by enjoying a picnic lunch. You’ll save even more coin!

5. Skipping a month

Try to go an extra month on purchases that usually hit your checkbook like clockwork. Do your own nails ($20). Let your hair grow eight weeks instead of four ($20). Wear that outfit another time or two before dry cleaning it ($10). That’s an extra $50 you saved without any effort. If you keep going with your bi-monthly plan, you could save $300 a year. Skipping a month could have you skipping all the way to the bank!

Related: How to Save $1,000 in One Month

Small Budget Cuts Lead to Big Savings

Making and keeping a budget can help you find other small changes that could put big bucks in your pocket instead of the cash register. And every little bit you save puts you that much closer to winning with money. That’s a big difference you’ll enjoy for a long time.

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

How to Save Money With a Purpose

How to Save Money With a Purpose

Every unplanned expense does not have to be a crisis. Imagine if you had $1,000 cash in your hand, ready to pay for that unexpected event. Most people are able to save $1,000 in just a month. You can do it. Turn crisis into peace and start building your emergency fund today!

  1. Hands clasped together

    1) Save for emergencies.

    Saving for emergencies is critical. Save $1,000 first, and then pay off your debt. After your debt is paid, save for three to six months’ worth of expenses. Saving for life’s little and larger emergencies means you’ll be ready for the unexpected.

  2. Exchanging US currency

    2) Save enough money to pay in cash.

    Save for the things you want and pay for them with cash. The only way you can break the habit of going into debt is to get ahead.

  3. Couple on vacation looking at a map

    3) Saving for retirement is important no matter your age.

    Retirement isn’t an age. It’s a financial number. After your debt is paid off, put 15% of your gross income into tax-favored plans such as your company’s 401(k) and Roth IRAs.

    If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

     

The Ultimate Travel Checklist

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The Ultimate Travel Checklist

7 MINUTE READ

Taking a vacation is a great way to unwind and relax. But getting prepped and ready for vacation can be a real pain in the neck! It’s easy to forget something along the way or miss a step in the planning process. And the last thing you want to take with you on your trip is stress!

Check out these travel checklists so you can be prepared before you hit the road.

Ultimate Travel Checklist

Travel Checklist #1: Getting Your House Ready

Here comes the “fun” part of walking through your home and doing the check. You know how it goes: it’s when you double- and triple-check everything before you can walk out the door in peace. Cross these things off your travel checklist when preparing your home for vacation.

  • Cut the lawn. Or ask a friendly neighbor to do it while you’re gone.
  • Take out the trash. Or roll it to the curb if you’ll be gone during trash pickup.
  • Finish the laundry. Don’t leave clothes in the washer or dryer. You don’t want to come home to mildewed clothes!
  • Change your bedsheets. You can’t beat the feeling of jumping into a freshly made bed, especially when it’s your own.
  • Set your thermostat to a lower level. Or turn it off completely. This will help you save on energy costs while you’re gone.
  • Get a timer for your outdoor lights. You don’t have to go Home Alone-style to make it look like you’re still there. A couple of well-timed lights will get the job done.
  • Leave a key with a neighbor (if you’re comfortable with it). This way, they’ll be able to keep an eye on the place for you and get in if there’s an emergency.
  • Check your water main and consider turning off the water supply. This will help you avoid a leak or—even worse—a burst pipe.
  • Unplug your electronics. We’re talking your computer, toaster and anything else you don’t need to run on a consistent basis. Your electric bill will thank you.
  • Clean out the refrigerator. Because really, no one wants to come home to molded food.
  • Clean up the kitchen. To avoid coming home to stink, don’t leave dirty dishes in the sink. And make sure to run the dishwasher before you leave!
  • Stock your shelves with nonperishables. That extra cereal and coffee will come in handy if you get back home and don’t want to go to the store.
  • Check your windows and doors. Make sure everything is shut tight and locked up.

Travel Checklist #2: Setting Your Itinerary

Now that you’ve gotten the pesky tasks of preparing your home for vacation out of the way, it’s time to make your trip itinerary.

 

Ready to start saving? Download our free budgeting tool today!

  • Figure out what days you want to be gone. Decide how long you want to take off and get to planning! The earlier you decide, the better everyone can stay in the loop with your travel plans.
  • Decide where you want to stay. Are you thinking a beach trip or just a quick getaway? Start checking those prices and pick what budget-friendly vacation you want to go on.
  • Send out your itinerary to emergency contacts. Share details like what days you’ll be in certain places, and don’t forget to include your flight and hotel information too!
  • Make copies or take pictures of important documents. This could include things like your reservations, itinerary, confirmation numbers, and driver’s license (just in case you lose the hard copies).

Travel Checklist #3: Getting Packed

Knowing you’re about to go on vacation is a great feeling. That is, until the realization hits that you need to pack! Ugh. Since we don’t live in the Jetsons’ world (yet!), that bag isn’t going to pack itself. Don’t stress! Think through the things you use on a daily basis and the things that’ll be needed on the trip—like your favorite pair of shades.

  • Clothing (don’t forget to check the weather report!)
  • Phone and tablet chargers
  • Umbrella(s)
  • Raincoat(s)
  • First-aid kit
  • Toiletries
  • Prescription medication

Travel Checklist #4: When Traveling by Airplane

Did you know air travel was once considered glamorous? It’s hard to imagine, isn’t it? People used to get dressed to the nines and relax as they flew the friendly skies. But just because air travel is a bit more frazzled these days doesn’t mean you can’t be prepared.

  • Check your flight status online 24 hours prior to departure.
  • Check-in for your flight via their app.
  • Put toiletries and liquid items that are going through security in clear, zip-close bags. Remember, keep it under 3.4 ounces!
  • Are you leaving your car at the airport? Take a picture of where you parked so you can find it easily when you get back.
  • Gather email addresses or phone numbers in case you need to contact your airline.

Travel Checklist #5: When Traveling by Car

If your summer excursion has you taking a long trip in the car, here are a few things to think about before you hit the road.

  • Get an oil change.
  • Fill the car with gas.
  • Check your jumper cables and emergency kit.
  • Make sure you have up-to-date insurance. Connect with an Endorsed Local Provider in your area to get the best rates!
  • Pack snacks and drinks. Loading up on snacks before you leave home will help you avoid paying high prices at gas stations along the way.
  • Decide if you’ll need extra pillows and blankets.
  • Grab some activities for the kids, like games, coloring books, tablets, and DVDs.
  • Gather some reading material or audiobooks. You can pass the time by learning more about how to jump-start your goals with our best-selling audiobooks.
  • And of course, make sure the car is stocked with all the music you could possibly need!

Travel Checklist #6: Staying Safe

Don’t get so caught up in the excitement of your vacation that you forget to focus some attention on your security. Here are some important steps you can take to keep your home and money safe while you’re traveling.

  • Put your mail on hold or have a family member or friend gather it for you. Letting mail linger in your mailbox for days puts you at greater risk of becoming a victim of identity theft.
  • Put your newspapers on hold or have them delivered to charity. One of the biggest giveaways that you’re out of town is a pile of newspapers in your driveway. You might as well just tape a sign to your front door that says, “Hey, world! We’re not home!”
  • Pay your bills. The last thing you want is to be greeted by late notices when you get back. Don’t let late fees for missed payments sneak up on you.
  • Call your bank to let them know the dates of your vacation. They can monitor your accounts for irregular activity and unauthorized transactions.
  • Confirm that your health insurance is up-to-date.
  • Secure your life insurance and personal documents in a safe or fireproof lockbox. Don’t have life insurance? Get a free life insurance quote from Zander Insurance!
  • Make sure you have an up-to-date will. This information should always be updated, but especially when you’re about to travel.
  • Use one debit card to minimize risk. And pay with cash at gas stations to avoid card-skimming devices at the pump.
  • Update and password-protect your smartphone in case it gets lost or stolen.
  • Keep your receipts so you can match them up with your statements later to confirm your expenses.
  • Secure valuables when you’re out of your room if you’re staying in a hotel.

Now comes the final step on our travel checklist—and it’s a big one: get out there and enjoy yourself!

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach

15 Cheap Vacation Ideas for Your Whole Family

15 Cheap Vacation Ideas for Your Whole Family

family building a sandcastle on the beach

9 MINUTE READ

Every season has its share of money temptations, but summer just might be the worst. The kids are out of school, the beach is calling your name, and every free hour seems like a good opportunity to drop everything and go on vacation. Blame it on the sun!

But how can you go on a fun trip when you’re on a budget?

15 Cheap Vacation Ideas

Here are 15 cheap vacation ideas that will let you get away without breaking the bank! So, put on The Beach Boys, bust out the shades, and start making your vacation list now.

1. Tour your own city

And this doesn’t mean you “tour” your house projects and work on your yard. We’re talking about getting out there and being a tourist in your own town.

Explore local art galleries, historical sites, that new restaurant you’ve been meaning to check out, or even half-price museum days. You can truly be as thrifty as you want with this one.

2. Go camping

family camping

Okay, so you can go the traditional “let’s sleep outside” route, or you can rent a cabin. Get out there and enjoy the great outdoors!

If you want the whole RV/camper experience but don’t actually want to drive the thing, Airbnb has you covered for as little as $39 a night.(1) Their hosts offer decked-out campers that stay put while you’re cozy and indoors. The youths call this “glamping”—you know, experiencing the great outdoors without dealing with that whole outdoors part.

 

Ready to start saving? Download our free budgeting tool today!

3. Go to the less popular beach

family on a beach

Certain beaches are going to be more popular and pricier than others (looking at you, Key West and Laguna Beach). But if you know where to look, you can save a pretty penny and still watch the tide roll in.

Coastline beaches are going to be more expensive than beaches along the Gulf. Sure, the water might look a little different, but when you’re coming from a landlocked area, a beach is a beach. Staying in a two-bedroom beach condo in Miami could cost you upwards of $100 more per night in comparison to the same type of lodging in Galveston, Texas. Plus, the Gulf beaches will have less expensive hotels, food and activities too.

4. Book travel packages using warehouse stores

We promise this isn’t as weird as it sounds. Club stores, like Costco, actually offer pretty good deals on vacation packages. If you’re planning a more elaborate vacation, you might want to consider what they have to offer.

For example, one Costco deal we found includes five days of accommodations for two adults at the Sheraton Vistana Resort Villas, Walt Disney World tickets, and car rental for about $1,900.(2) But if you paid for your hotel stay, Disney passes, and car rental separately, it would set you back about $2,200. That’s a savings of over $300 just by being smart about who you book with.

We know travel packages like this change pretty quickly, so you might not find this exact deal. The point is: If you’re on the lookout for a bargain, you should be able to find one if you know where to look!

5. Stay with friends or family

It’s not glamorous—and some people might not even consider it a true vacation—but staying with friends or family is an easy cheap vacation idea. Plus, you’ll get to spend time with the people you love!

More than likely, you won’t have to pay for lodging or some meals. That means you’ll only have to foot the bill to get to your destination. This should drastically cut back on your travel costs.

But make sure you’re a great guest while you’re staying there. Don’t be a mooch! Pay for groceries or cook some meals to show your gratitude. Maybe even treat your loved ones to dinner or dessert while you’re in town! You want to score an invite back, don’t you?

6. Travel during the off-season

mother and child traveling on empty train

Everyone loves taking a vacation in the summer, but pushing it out just a few more months could save you a bundle. Traveling during fall break (or any time after Labor Day weekend) can be a great cheap vacation idea.

Remember, though: Peak-season and off-season will change depending on where you’re planning to go. A good rule of thumb is to avoid traveling during the summer months, winter break, and holidays. Do your research before you book!

7. Go away on a weekend trip

If you need to get away, leaving town for the weekend can be just what the doctor ordered. Is it as restful as a 10-day trip? Well, no. But it’s not nearly as expensive. Budget for a quick weekend getaway, and you might be pleasantly surprised at how affordable it can be.

8. Take a vacation on a weekday

All right, this is the exact opposite of the last idea, but hear us out. Most of the time, booking a hotel or Airbnb for the weekend is pricier than staying there during the week. So, if you can afford to use some vacation time at work, try booking a quick, midweek vacation.

9. Visit a national park

father with toddler on shoulders walking through a park

The greatest thing about nature is that it’s usually pretty much free to enjoy. Oh, and it’s beautiful—added bonus! Don’t sweat it if you don’t live anywhere near Yosemite or the Grand Canyon. Did you know there are actually 61 national parks across the United States? Find one near you and go explore! Just know the parks might have a small entrance fee to pay per vehicle or person.

10. Stay at a bed-and-breakfast nearby

Sure, some B&Bs are known for being over the top and out of a budgeter’s price range. But many bed-and-breakfasts can actually be budget friendly if they roll meals and activities into the price of a nightly stay.

A bed-and-breakfast in Nashville generally runs around $100 to $275 per night.(3) But considering you’ll get homemade breakfast at the very least (hence the name) and other meals throughout your stay, it’s really not a bad deal.

A lot of B&Bs even throw in extras, like coffee and cookies or wine and cheese, in the lobby area. Depending on your location, some bed-and-breakfasts offer kayaks, bikes or canoes for you to take for a spin for free.

11. Get insider tips

Okay, let’s say you already know you’re going to go big and plan a vacation to Disney World, but you still want to be smart and do Disney on a budget. You need to make collecting all the insider tips your part-time job. Scour the internet, ask friends and family, and do your research across the board to learn all the things you need to know before booking the trip.

Just because it’s “the most magical place on Earth” doesn’t mean you can’t do it on the cheap!

12. Explore your own region

dad taking picture of daughters holding fish by a lake and smiling

On the flip side, taking a vacation doesn’t mean you have to go to Disneyland . . . or Paris . . . or take a Caribbean cruise. If you want cheap vacation ideas, look no further than your own region.

Decide to go somewhere that’s maybe just one or two hours away from home. You’ll be out of town while (hopefully) avoiding the sticker shock of busy vacation areas. And you’ll save money by not dealing with flights or long drives!

13. Book in advance

One of the best cheap vacation ideas is booking your trip far in advance. We’re not saying you have to plan it years out, but your chances of getting good prices are a lot higher when you don’t wait until the month before you want to go.

Online travel hubs, like Groupon and Expedia, pride themselves in offering great, last-minute vacation deals. And if you’re just trying to find a last-minute hotel in a pinch, look into Hotel Tonight.

14. Book a rental car with your debit card

Trying to book a rental car with your debit card used to be a huge pain. Sure, some places would let you do it, but they basically wanted you to submit to a background check, leave your first-born child as collateral, and pat your head while rubbing your belly. In other words, there were a lot of hoops to jump through.

Now, Dollar Car Rental makes renting a car with a debit card super easy. No hoops, no making you feel like a second-class citizen—just pick up your car and hit the road. And how does it save you money? Simple. It’s not being charged to a credit card and collecting interest months after your vacation ended—that’s how.

15. Take a staycation

family laughing in a swimming pool

Take those vacation days and get ready to stay at home! There are plenty of ways to be creative (and thrifty) without losing the fun factor. Plan out which nights of the week you want to take your family out to eat or explore downtown. And don’t forget to meal plan for the nights you’ll eat at home too. Try sprucing up your backyard and tossing some burgers on the grill!

How to Save for Your Cheap Vacation

We hate to break it to you, but the money for your cheap vacation isn’t just going to magically appear in your bank account. This is why having a budget is such a big deal!

Once you figure out when you want to go on vacation, budget out what looks like a reasonable amount of money to save for your family. The amount you’re able to put aside will impact where you go and how long you can stay. You may need to sell things and make temporary lifestyle sacrifices. But don’t worry! There are plenty of ways you can save up cash quickly.

We’re all for you having a dream vacation, but don’t go into debt for it! When you save up, pay in cash, and try these tips, you’ll be able to enjoy your vacation without having to worry about bills following you home.

If a leader doesn’t convey passion and intensity then there will be no passion and intensity within the organization and they’ll start to fall down and get depressed. Get Your Free Position Now http://lock-in-your-position.com/lp3/?sponsor=homeprofitcoach